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Ranibizumab: A Review in Retinopathy of Prematurity

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posted on 20.01.2021, 00:26 by Arnold Lee, Matt Shirley

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding.

Authorship and Conflict of interestArnold Lee and Matt Shirley are salaried employees of Adis International Ltd/Springer Nature, are responsible for the article content and declare no relevant conflicts of interest. All authors contributed to the review and are responsible for the article content.

Ethics approval, Consent to participate, Consent to publish, Availability of data and material, Code availability not applicable


Additional information about this Adis Drug Review can be found here


Abstract

Ranibizumab (Lucentis®) is a monoclonal antibody fragment targeted against VEGF-A that is the first approved anti-VEGF agent for the treatment of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). In the pivotal, randomized, phase III RAINBOW trial in infants with ROP, the majority of intravitreal ranibizumab recipients experienced treatment success at 24 weeks, with a numerically greater treatment success rate in the ranibizumab 0.2 mg (80% of patients) than laser therapy (66%) group without reaching statistical significance for superiority. Long-term effects on vision following ranibizumab treatment are not yet known, but interim analyses from the RAINBOW extension study do not show evidence of degraded vision. Adverse reactions to ranibizumab in pediatric patients were consistent with the known safety profile in adults, with most adverse reactions attributed to the intravitreal injection procedure. Furthermore, systemic VEGF suppression was not observed in clinical trials, which is congruent with the rapid systemic clearance of ranibizumab. Overall, ranibizumab is an effective and generally well tolerated treatment for ROP and is not associated with systemic VEGF suppression. Although results for its long-term effects on vision are not yet available, ranibizumab is a promising alternative option to laser therapy for treating ROP.


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